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Squeeze Some Breasts and Save a Life -- Breast Cancer Awareness

I like breasts. They are functional, fun, and aesthetically pleasing.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

One of the most terrifying questions a woman will ask herself is "Is that a lump?"

If you're a man... and you like breasts... there are three things you should do.

First, donate.

There are several reputable charities that do research, treatment, recovery, support and prevention. Men, if you enjoy breasts as much as SunFyre, please donate.

I'm aware of three national charities that are very reputable. They are the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, National Breast Cancer Foundation, and the American Cancer Society.

Additionally, many communities have breast cancer treatment foundations and endowments. Contact your local hospital or United Way and ask them what charities would benefit from your donations locally.

Second... buy something pink.

If you're not secure enough in your sexuality to wear it, give it to a woman that you love. Every year women's clothing stores and a variety of other department stores support Breast Cancer by offering pink products and donating a portion of the proceeds to Breast Cancer charities. They usually contain a pink ribbon, the symbol for Breast Cancer support.

If you happened to be the owner of the store that men frequent, I urge you to create your own products. I think there should be a breast cancer first person shooter game, preferably one with zombies. Zombies are cool.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, squeeze some breasts.

Seriously. While annual doctor's visits are important, and breast self-examination is also important, many lumps are discovered by male partners. All breasts have a little fibrous tissue that can be felt. One indicator is changes in this tissue. Men often notice these changes, simply because they are typically paying attention when they manipulate a woman's breasts. A physician only sees a particular woman once a year, and can only notice problems if lumps are large, or if they show up on a mammogram. A husband can monitor the situation weekly, or perhaps daily, and the test is far less expensive!

One small warning... please make sure you have permission of the woman that you intend to examine. She may not find your willingness to save her life a comfort if she doesn't know it's coming. For example, as I've experienced myself, the large breasted woman in front of you at the checkout counter at the grocery store, while her life may be at risk, may also have a brick in her purse. Ouch!

All kidding aside, best wishes for women and their families affected by this disease.

Each October I usually write a blog post about how much we like them, and how men should be more involved in Breast Cancer awareness. This year it's a little more personal.

Last November I lost one of my closest family friends to breast cancer. Diane and my mother met while they were both pregnant. My mother gave birth to me and Diane gave birth to a little girl named Dawn 10 days later. Diane was a nurse and my mother was a substitute teacher; at that time both low-paying jobs. They would babysit for each other because neither could afford child care. Dawn and I became lifelong friends, and "Aunt Diane" as I called her became like a second mother. Diane Sandstedt died last November; she was 57.

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