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Disabled characters on Aardman show


The creators of Wallace and Gromit have unveiled their latest characters - all of whom share a disability.

Aardman Animations have teamed up with the Leonard Cheshire Disability charity to launch Creature Discomforts, based on their much-loved Creature Comforts series.

The six animal characters are voiced by disabled people who talk about the discrimination and difficulties they encounter.

Peg the Hedgehog, Slim the Stick Insect, Flash the Sausage Dog, Tim the Tortoise, Spud the Slug and Brian the Bull Terrier will feature in TV adverts from January. They are available to view online at www.creaturediscomforts.org.

The campaign aims to highlight the disadvantages that disabled people experience every day, and to raise awareness among the public.

It will feature in newspapers, magazines, bus stops and online from Thursday, and in TV adverts in January.

Recent research carried out by the charity revealed that nine out of 10 disabled people in the UK believe they are the victims or prejudice or discrimination.

Bryan Dutton, director-general of Leonard Cheshire Disability, said: "We want people to change the way they see disability, to think and act differently and to make a positive difference to the lives of disabled people.

"Creature Comforts is well known and much-loved for its ability to bring home messages in a simply, everyday way. Our Creative Discomforts campaign builds on this, making a serious point with humour."

The campaign's director, Steve Harding-Hill of Aardman, said: "Taking the real voices and experiences of disabled people and creating animated stories that are informative, entertaining and poignant has been an immense but incredibly satisfying challenge."

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