Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from August, 2011

AT&T, T-Mobile Merger -- an open letter to the Federal Trade Commission

There is discussion about a merger between AT&T and T-Mobile.
Today there are only four significant players in the cell phone market.
A merger between AT&T and T-Mobile would effectively reduce that number to two. The resulting company would only experience realistic competition from Verizon. Sprint would become a distant third competitor.
I see two critical issues:
First, we need more competition among mobile phone service providers, not less. Consumers pay significantly more in the United States than other countries for service. A merger will likely lead to increased prices and could potentially lead to poorer overall quality.Secondly, and perhaps most importantly, the United States is becoming increasingly dependent on mobile data communications. We need more competition to increase bandwidth speeds, increase quality, and decrease expenses to consumers and businesses.I believe approving a merger between AT&T and T-Mobile would be irresponsible and dangerou…

The Worst Part of Being Disabled

The central character of my novel is a wheelchair user. I know that's no big surprise.

It's important to me, however, that I'm able to relate the experience of severe disability to a universal audience. I want to make sure the character expresses his worldview in a powerful way.

For example, you can close your eyes, but that doesn't help you truly understand blindness.

Every so often I hear about some sociology professor who gives everyone a disability for a day. People come up to me and tell me how they learned to understand my limitations and frustrations because they borrowed a wheelchair and went to the mall.  If they want to understand my frustrations, they should borrow a wheelchair and go to a job interview.

Whether you have been disabled your entire life, or spent your life in perfect physical condition, I want to get your perceptions on true disability.

What do you feel is the worst part about being disabled? Please be very specific. You can choose any disability, …

The Year of Lies Begins.

Year 41 will be the year of lies.

About a decade ago I started writing. Actually, I started writing in college keeping a journal of my thoughts, mostly rambling insights of my life during the late 80s. Writing is strange during your late teens and 20s. You have all the vocabulary, eloquent words, to put together beautiful sentences yet you haven't lived. Until you've experienced sorrow and triumph you can't really write about it.

My words are less eloquent today.

In my 30s more and more of my work required writing. By my late 30s virtually all of my income came from taking things I learned and crafting words about them in illustrative ways to make others understand them. I developed a knack for teaching using storytelling. I've written articles for business journals, books, and sales copy. I've inspired people, sold products, sold ideas and sold expertise. I've made a comfortable living writing my version of the truth.

I continued to write fiction, but have never t…

The Year of Lies

Year 41 will be the Year of Lies.

About a decade ago I started writing. Actually, I started writing in college keeping a journal of my thoughts, mostly rambling insights of my life during the late 80s. Writing is strange during your late teens and 20s. You have all the vocabulary, eloquent words, to put together beautiful sentences yet you haven't lived. Until you've experienced sorrow and triumph you can't really write about it.

My words are less eloquent today.

In my 30s more and more of my work required writing. By my late 30s virtually all of my income came from taking things I learned and crafting words about them in illustrative ways to make others understand them. I developed a knack for teaching using storytelling. I've written articles for business journals, books, and sales copy. I've inspired people, sold products, sold ideas and sold expertise. I've made a comfortable living writing my version of the truth.

I continued to write fiction, but have nev…

Answering Machines -- The End of an Era... and My Fun

I called my friend Mandy today and got her answering machine. She works at home, so when someone calls she usually lets it go to the machine.
It occurred to me that she is perhaps the only person that I can leave a message, and likely be assured she's listening to me at that moment.

It used to be that everybody screened calls. You'd let the machine pick up, find out who it was, and as they were leaving a message decided whether or not to pick up. Sure, you'd say "Sorry, I was just in the bathroom... I was just cooking bacon... the TV was too loud" as an excuse, but we always knew you were screening calls. It was okay; we do it too.

I loved answering machines. I love leaving crazy messages for those close friends whom recognize me by voice. In my mind they were always listening to me from the shower, from the kitchen, or while they were having intimate relations with a significant, or perhaps insignificant, other.


Here are some of my personal favorites. Yes, I…