Skip to main content

Whoopee Cushion -- Supporting Families Since 1920



My children each received a $5.00 gift card to Dollar General for Valentine's Day. This may seem like a strange gift, but when your gross income is only $6.00 per week, it can be a favorite store.

Last night, my wife and I took the children to Dollar General in search of treasures.

My son found a Whoopee Cushion and my daughter found a fart machine, which can make six equally disgusting noises at the touch of a button. The novelty wore off before we left the store, so they opted for other purchases, but something occurred to me on the drive home....

... There is an entire industry, perhaps employing hundreds of people, in the manufacturing and distribution of devices that make flatulence sounds. What an awesome niche!

Somewhere there are little first graders who bring Dad into work on Career Day and he tells the children that he engineers whoopee cushions. Everyone likes it except the little girl whose dad is a firefighter, because she no longer has the coolest dad.

The Whoopee cushion was invented in 1920 by JEM rubber Co. of Toronto Canada. For the past 92 years the desire of nine-year-olds (and more than a few adult males) to make flatulence sounds artificially has supported manufacturer, distribution, and, yes, even technological advancement of the device.

Sources and Related Links:

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Friday Funnies: a couple LOLcats and one shameless plug

Is this the new flavor at Kungaloosh Gourmet Tea Company?

Friday Funnies: Aging Gracefully

I pointed to two old drunks sitting across the bar from us and told my friend, "That's us in 10 years".

He said "That's a mirror, dip-shit!"
---





Sunfyre's Google Glass Fundraiser (a.k.a. shameless begging)

Well, Google Glass went on sale today for a limited time to the general public.

Unfortunately, I can't exactly spare $1500 right now.… Commence shameless begging!

I try not to play the "help the disabled guy" card.  It goes against my nature. But in this case, I figured I'd make an exception (at least this is how I'm rationalizing it in my own head).

Google Glass has amazing potential for people like me. I can't use my arms or legs any longer. I use my voice recognition software to type, design websites, write articles and marketing plans for clients.

In the era of smart phones, they aren't very friendly to people like me. Most of them can't be navigated with a mouse, and even Apple's Siri doesn't do a great job with voice activation. First, you have to press a button just to get her attention.

but with this device, which connects through my android phone, I'd be able to read email and navigate my basic telephone functions with wearable g…