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Tips for Print Photography


Here are few quick tips that may help if you're thinking about having prints of your digital photos produced.

  • For the best quality artwork, use the highest resolution your camera can handle. To put it simply, the higher the resolution, the larger you can print the image. If your resolution is too low, you will see a warning when you upload.
  • Black-and-white images add a lot of modern drama to the room. To really make the images pop, choose a canvas museum wrap, or a black frame and a white mat. The black frame creates a strong contrast while also complimenting the gray tones of your image.
  • Ever wonder what causes red eyes in photos? Basically, the light from a flash is being reflected from the back of the eyeball! The good news is that most modern cameras have a quick setting to reduce red eye.
  • Think you only use a flash in the dark? Guess again. When photographing in bright sunlight, you can turn on the flash of your camera to reduce the harshness of the shadows.
  • As you decide where to hang your photo artwork, keep in mind that the optimum viewing distance for a framed print (or canvas wrap) is about twice the diagonal of the frame.
  • Want to capture your subject in mid-motion like the pros do? Simply use a higher shutter speed and a higher ISO setting to freeze the motion. A higher ISO setting is also ideal for dimmer conditions, like cloudy days or indoor shots.


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