Skip to main content

Japanese Tsunami Proves American Education Sucks

Today I read an article about the giant debris field floating toward California that is the result of the Japanese tsunami from 2011. The principle focus was that nearly three years later the largest density of debris will be landing on West Coast beaches.

But this quote got me thinking:
In April, a 20ft boat ran aground at Crescent City, California. It was formally identified as a boat that belonged to the marine sciences program at Takata High School in the city of Rikuzentakata. 
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2487555/Island-debris-size-TEXAS-2011-Japanese-tsunami-headed-straight-U-S.html#ixzz2jsPGh3J7 
How many of our high schools have marine sciences programs? In fact, how many of our high schools have any kind of in-depth science program?

Our newspapers are full of news stories about bullying and the lack of services for autistic and learning disabled children. We use phrases like, "No child left behind" to demonstrate how we lift up the kids who struggle and make them feel better by pulling them closer to the norm.

Today teachers are judged on aptitude averages rather than putting focus on the exceptional.

Don't get me wrong. I believe that every autistic child, every kid with mental health disabilities, kids who learn differently deserve and are entitled to all the help they currently receive. Every kids deserves the effort of our education system to give them the best chance at becoming active and productive members of our citizenry. I have first hand knowledge of how kids with physical disabilities have limits imposed on them.

But with that said, shouldn't we also be focusing educational resources on the elite children? Shouldn't we be pouring extra money into math and science programs to make sure that the average American child can compete in a global economy? Shouldn't we make sure the arts and music remain in the forefront and focus on the massive quality these careers deliver to our overall society?

Today India graduates more college students with Computer Science degrees than we graduate from all colleges combined. China and Japan have both moved massive volumes of their people into world class cities with top universities.

As a nation, America has been built on entrepreneurship, excellence in agriculture, business and industry. As the world changes to a technologically integrated society, we need to maintain this level of learning. The American spirit is unique, and powerful, but it can't thrive without the foundation of education.

Education drove the Renaissance making Europe the focal point of the world.

Education drove the Industrial Revolution moving America to the forefront.

It will be education that drives the next evolution of the world economy, and it's critical that Americans remain leaders in education if we have any desire to control our own destiny going forward.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

People who died on the toilet (real people and fictional characters)

Famous people who died on the toilet. Here is an extensive list of real people who died on the throne. Elvis Presley died of an overdose, falling off the toilet into a pile of his own vomit. Judy Garland died of an overdose discovered slumped over her toilet. King George II of Britain suffered a heart attack while sitting on the toilet. Wenceslaus III of Bohemia assassinated with a spear while he sat on the toilet. Godfrey IV, Duke of Lower Lorraine, was attacked by an assassin while sitting on the toilet. He died a week after the attack. Japanese warlord Uesugi Kenshin was assassinated with a spear while sitting on the toilet. British author Evelyn Waugh, who coincidently also married a woman named Evelyn, died on his toilet. Some believe he drowned in it, however his official cause of death was heart failure. Famed architect Louis Kahn suffered a heart attack and died on the toilet in New York City’s Penn station. One of the early Christian preachers, Arius, had been condemned as a…

Personal Space: an invisible disability

The worst part about being disabled for me may surprise you.  In a previous post I invited you to share your thoughts about disability. (See:  The Worst Part of Being Disabled)

I face numerous frustrating challenges on a daily basis. I'm constantly dependent on others. I need help bathing and dressing. I can't drive, cook, hold a book or feed myself. I rely on family, employees, technology and the goodwill of others. Some days it's frustrating, but I've learned through experience how to manage all this help.

Other frustrations are attitudinal barriers. Today I live very comfortably and have a high family income. I'm an entrepreneur, but not because of my unquenchable desire to build businesses, but because very few companies would be willing to give me a job. I made the decision more than 15 years ago that I could build a business easier than I could find a job, so that's what I did.

My single biggest frustration however isn't getting the help I need or overco…

How United Airlines Should Have Handled the Situation

United Airlines is under fire for a viral video that shows them removing a passenger forcibly from an airplane bound for Louisville Kentucky.
Here are the bullets:

The plane was already loaded and full.The airline needed to fly four employees to Louisville Kentucky on the plane. The employees needed to go to prevent another plane from departing late.The airline offered $800 in compensation to the first four people who would volunteer to give up their seats. No one took the offer.The airline went to a lottery, drawing for people at random. These four people were asked to leave the plane, and they would receive the compensation.One of the passengers refused to leave. It's unclear how things escalated, however he was removed by security officers. Reports are conflicting about whether the officers were police officers, TSA workers, or airline staff.The gentleman was literally physically dragged down the aisle receiving while screaming in protest and physically abused in the process.Ap…